Archive for the ‘Media’ Category

Venezuela, now, like Puerto Rico, US colony?

2017-07-30

Operation Condor, this time Condor 2.0 and in full flight?

Those continuing, mob-instigated violent confrontations in a Venezuela beset by a severe economic crisis have made a bad situation worse. Not only that, to confirm any lingering doubts comes an official US statement of intention to depose a democratically-elected sovereign government; and for impeccable timing that statement comes just a month or so after release of a report on the affair in Iran in 1953, and with a sundered and tragic Libya (strong language alert) still fresh in mind. (more…)

At the guarimbas, democracy blazes

2017-07-30

Or where responsible journalism is again abandoned to promote an agenda, and where it becomes no more than full-throated propaganda to support ‘régime change’ – the overthrow of yet another ‘insubordinate’ sovereign nation-state, one with massive reserves of hydrocarbons. (more…)

Democracy and the US presidential elections

2016-11-12

The democracy most know has over the years undergone a radical transformation in the United States. Where one person, one vote would traditionally work, in the US the candidates in general tend to represent the corporations that fund their candidacy and political positions. The two political parties which admit of no serious contenders have become corporate, and the citizens they are elected to represent have been largely ignored – until the next voting cycle approaches. (more…)

Social media, and uniting indigenous nations

2016-10-12

The times, they do change. With the corporate media then in totally unchallenged dominance, the voiceless were just that, and an awkward irritant best left ignored. However, with the advent of social media, nations and their peoples that have long existed, but studiously ignored, now have their voices heard. With the corporate media, the plunder of resources – with assorted intimidating murders of community or tribal leaders – would be rationalised as deterring ‘terrorists’ (or evil Communists in another era) from depriving their disadvantaged people of the benefits of ‘civilisation’. The times have changed, as ‘legacy’ media are increasingly being treated with the opprobrium deserved, well-deserved. (more…)

09Oct67 – ‘Che’

2016-10-09

Today, 09Oct, marks 49 years that Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara was murdered in Bolivia. As is known, the illustrious ‘Che’ had embarked on a mission to promote the liberation of the masses of people oppressed by corrupt, cupidinous governments imposed by oligarchs or outside powers.  With, The Legacy of Ernesto ‘Che’ Guevara, TeleSUR pays homage to one of the giants of the 20th century, with his light still shining brightly into the 21st – significantly different from  those corporate media-created ‘leaders’,  ‘heroes’, college-degreed mediocrities of insignificant accomplishment and, most assuredly, destined to rather prompt despatch to historical oblivion. (more…)

Dying for a better life, and suddenly a violent death

2016-08-14

What a maligned lot those Central American immigrants to the US. As the saying would go: But for luck there go I? For many, at great personal sacrifice many of their dreams fulfilled; for most, dreams frustrated, and wretched lives do often ensue. Which brings us to those on the streets whose existence we barely notice, despite their increasing prevalence: the homeless, the vagrant.

And that brings us to the brief life, and sudden, brutal death of a Central American immigrant to the US, in the city of San Francisco. The Guardian, which has focused attention on a problem ignored by most US media, that of deaths of US citizens occasioned by its police, now turns its attention to ‘the invisible’ on the streets of the US. Its story, The life and death of Luis Góngora: the police killing nobody noticed,  is compelling and recommends re-telling. A sample, its dramatic start, to the brief life and violent death of a young Mayan from the village of Teabo in the Yucatán, Mexico. (more…)

An episode, bloody, of US history

2015-12-30

History seems an implacable pursuer – and that despite the best efforts of the very obliging ‘legacy’ media. This week an episode in the bloody history of the United States, one of extirpation and decimation and dehumanisation and dispossession, is commemorated.

Abby Zimet of Common Dreams recounts the event, Like Grass Before the Sickle An excerpt,

December 29 marks the 125th anniversary of the Wounded Knee massacre, when soldiers from the U.S. 7th Cavalry gunned down almost 300 cold, hungry, unarmed Lakota Sioux men, women and children who had come together for a Ghost Dance. For days, the bodies of Chief Big Foot (Spotted Elk) and his band lay frozen in the snow; they were eventually buried in a rough mass grave.

And that was just one of very many atrocities committed in the US, yet countless in other countries, where the role of the obliging media would be first to ignore the occurrence; if not, blame the victims; then rationalise the event – all a tragic mistake. Today’s NYT recollection of the 1890 massacre is instructive, and unsurprising.

A major consolation to the no longer small yet growing viewership of blogs and other digital media is that, unlike the many who rely on the corporate media, very few would have been credulous enough to accept the existence of the non-existent Muslim country of Agrabah, which their counterparts so fervently wanted to obliterate. Which answers the question, ‘What is propaganda?’

That myth of the benevolent and compassionate United States, all myth.

A Dickens of a time?

2015-12-25

No time better. And US economist Tim Taylor has been the guide.

That Christmas Carol of Charles Dickens, a customary seasonal read, not to mention the essential viewing of Alastair Sim’s portrayal of Ebenezer Scrooge. Both a now a tradition.

Those impelled to follow the commercial gospel of ‘Shop till you drop!’ may have had little time to contemplate the, if not religious, spiritual significance of the season. Such, in their frenetic pursuits, will have missed life, in its various forms of emptiness and despair, around them. Of course, for some these same unfortunates their own bill may soon come due.

Thus, today is better than any to do an accounting. And we go back in time. Charles Dickens would recount a stroll with a friend one winter’s night in London, A NIGHTLY SCENE IN LONDON. One telling excerpt,

Crouched against the wall of the Workhouse,
in the dark street, on the muddy pavement-
stones, with the rain raining upon them, were
five bundles of rags. They were motionless,
and had no resemblance to the human form.
Five great beehives, covered with ragsfive
dead bodies taken out of graves, tied neck
and heels, and covered with ragswould
have looked like those five bundles upon
which the rain rained down in the public
street.

What is this! ” said my companion. “What is this!”

Some miserable people shut out of the
Casual Ward, I think,” said I.

Times have since changed. Roads are paved. Smart phones abound. And the poverty and destitution, though not as dire, ignored by policy makers, is made invisible or the victims’ fault by a cooperative corporate media that ensure that their distractions make the problem disappear.

Kindness is no sign of weakness, of human frailty.

Venezuela, social progress against all odds

2015-12-06

As is known, Venezuela sits on one of the largest reserves of hydrocarbons in the world. Such wealth is not lost on those who seek to acquire it, by all means fair and foul. Nor was the purpose of the move by ExxonMobil into the Esequibo region of territory in dispute between Venezuela and Guyana not obvious.

To date such efforts have failed generally, and not because of no strenuous efforts to destabilise the government and damage the economy of the country – as damage there has been, other than from the massive crash in oil prices.

Today elections are being held for 167 parliamentary seats, and the government faces a strong challenge, due in large part to shortages and other inconveniences – even as many shortages were exposed as created through private sector failure to produce consumer goods or through contraband of subsidised products heading for Colombia, with one avenue being through Táchira. (more…)

That day at the UN – President Hugo Chávez

2015-09-21

That moment in history that would attract and hold the attention of so many, Remembering Hugo Chávez’s Speech at the UN

Of course, as is now very apparent, the sulphur emanates more so from the establishment than its messenger .